scold

scold n shrew, vixen, termagant, *virago, amazon
scold vb Scold, upbraid, rate, berate, tongue-lash, jaw, bawl, chew out, wig, rail, revile, vituperate can all mean to reprove, reproach, or censure angrily, harshly, and more or less abusively.
Scold, the term most common in ordinary use, usually implies a rebuking in a mood of irritation or ill temper, with or without sufficient justification
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his father scolded him for staying out late

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our great authors have scolded the nation more than they praised it. Often their scolding has been . . . wholly justified, but often too it has been eccentric or ill-informed— Malcolm Cowley

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Upbraid stresses reproaching or censuring on more definite grounds than scold does and usually suggests justification or justifiable anger
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the judge upbraided the parents for the delinquency of their children

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I think he'd meant to upbraid me for sneaking off, but he didn't— Cather

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he had so often upbraided her for her superficiality— Sackville-West

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Rate and the more common berate usually imply more or less prolonged, angry, and sometimes abusive scolding either in censuring or in reprimanding
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the voice continued violently rating me— Hudson

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hearing Ed Hall berate a farmer who doubted the practicability of the machine— Anderson

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Fairly close synonyms of rate and berate are the expressive tongue-lash which stresses the punitive effect on the person berated
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tongue-lashed them in a way that could be heard blocks off— Fast

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suffer from a fifteen-minute tongue-lashing

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and the crude terms jaw, bawl, usually with out, chew out, and wig (chiefly British), which emphasize the noisy prolonged ranting which usually attends a berating
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I have been jawed for letting you go— Marryat

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you'll get bawled out when you pull a boner— Mathewson

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some niggling Quartermaster lieutenant chewed them out because they were a few hundred cases short— Liebling

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a subordinate . . . who presumably had been severely wigged by his chief— The Times

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Rail carries a more definite implication of either abusive or scoffing language than rate or berate
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enemies . . . rail at him for crimes he is not guilty of— Junius

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the couples railed at the chant and the frown of the witchmen lean, and laughed them down— Lindsay

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Revile carries a much stronger implication of abusive, scurrilous language than rail does but little, if any, suggestion of scoffing; it often also implies deliberate vilification
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the words humiliated her, the tone reviled her . . . they were the clashes of naked hate— Farrell

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her tenants, who have to earn the money she spends abroad . . . revile her as a fugitive and an absentee— Shaw

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Vituperate implies more violence in the censure and in the method of attack than does revile, but otherwise they are close synonyms
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he vituperated from the pulpit the vices of the court— Froude

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the last image that crossed his mind was Sir James with his angry face and his trembling hands vituperating him— Archibald Marshall

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Analogous words: reprehend, reprobate, censure, blame, *criticize: reproach, reprimand, *reprove, rebuke, admonish, chide: *execrate, objurgate

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • scold´er — scold «skohld», verb, noun. –v.t. to find fault with; blame with angry words: »His brother scolded him for breaking the baseball bat. –v.i. 1. to find fault; talk angrily: »Don t scold so much. 2. Obsolete. to quarrel noisily; brawl. ╂[< noun] …   Useful english dictionary

  • Scold — Scold, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scolded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scolding}.] [Akin to D. schelden, G. schelten, OHG. sceltan, Dan. skielde.] To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter harsh, rude, boisterous rebuke; to chide sharply or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scold — Scold, n. 1. One who scolds, or makes a practice of scolding; esp., a rude, clamorous woman; a shrew. [1913 Webster] She is an irksome, brawling scold. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A scolding; a brawl. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scold — [skəuld US skould] v [T] [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: Probably from a Scandinavian language] to angrily criticize someone, especially a child, about something they have done = ↑tell off ▪ Do not scold the puppy, but simply and firmly say no. scold… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • scold — scold·er; scold·ing·ly; scold; …   English syllables

  • Scold — Scold, v. t. To chide with rudeness and clamor; to rate; also, to rebuke or reprove with severity. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scold — [skōld] n. [ME scolde < ON skald, poet (prob. of satirical verses)] a person, esp. a woman, who habitually uses abusive language vt. [ME scolden < the n.] to find fault with angrily; rebuke or chide severely vi. 1. to find fault angrily 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • scold — index castigate, denounce (condemn), disapprove (condemn), fault, inveigh, rebuke, remonstrate …   Law dictionary

  • scold — (n.) mid 12c., person of ribald speech, also person fond of abusive language, from O.N. skald poet (see SKALD (Cf. skald)). The sense evolution may reflect the fact that Germanic poets (like their Celtic counterparts) were famously feared for… …   Etymology dictionary

  • scold — [v] find fault with abuse, admonish, asperse, berate, blame, castigate, cavil, censure, chasten, chide, criticize, denounce, disparage, dress down*, expostulate, give a talking to*, jump on*, keep aft*, lay down the law*, lecture, light into*,… …   New thesaurus

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